FOLLOWING THE COURSE OF THE FORMAL
INVESTIGATION INTO THE SINKING OF THE TRAWLER TRIDENT

Friday, 14 May 2010

FV Trident – the upcoming court drama

The FV Trident inquiry is expected to start in October this year. Meanwhile, relatives of the crew, it has been announced, will submit an expert [1] report suggesting that stability problems were a contributing factor to the capsize and loss of the vessel.
There is also, of course, the official joint report, compiled by a 14-man expert panel, which, we are told, attributes the loss of the Trident to ‘seakeeping problems’.
These differences of opinion on what caused the tragedy are likely to add further delays to the formal inquiry.

Although we have not seen either of the above-mentioned reports, we would like to venture a couple of preliminary observations on the subject:
First, the seakeeping ability of a vessel - which the panel of experts in the Trident inquiry are geared up to blame for the tragedy - is a composite notion, vague enough and large enough to embrace a number of possibilities. Unlike stability, there is no agreed or regulatory yardstick attached to ‘seakeeping’ above which a vessel can be deemed to be safe. Hence, pointing the finger at seakeeping is almost like saying that the vessel did not perform well, that something was wrong with the vessel, without explaining what that was.
In such a case, it is to be expected that cause and effect and, therefore, blame and liability would be rather difficult to establish. [2]
And second, it would be very unfair if the expert reports attached to this public inquiry were not to be made public. Having paid, so far, no less than £3 million for the research into the causes of the Trident disaster, the taxpayer deserves full access to that information.

Anyway, as we have mentioned before, we will be taking a keen interest in the developments of this inquiry, and we hope that officialdom will not be tempted to try their luck again and replicate the travesties of justice that were the Gaul and Derbyshire formal inquiries.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[1] Expert report on stability deficiencies by Mr Martin Pullinger, naval architect with over 30 years of experience with Burness Corlett & Partners – a marine consultancy firm who provided technical advice to the Gaul and Derbyshire formal investigations.
[2] This is perhaps the first indication of possible government interference in what should be an impartial technical process.

1 comment:

  1. Breakdown Inspection of Material during Yacht repair Inspection.
    There are different types of materials used in structures and how structures are put together to resist the forces. All of the above has been based on the supposition that the materials remain and function in accordance with their normal properties. However, in practice all materials are subject to degradation over time from a variety of different sources. some examples of materials used for yachts noted in their several years of experience by constellation marine inspectors are as under:-
    Wood and dhows Repair Inspection.
    Timber that has been well seasoned and that is kept in a uniform state of moisture (neither too wet nor too dry) when properly ventilated will remain stable and with no significant degradation for many hundreds of years. However, as a naturally occurring material, wood has naturally occurring enemies which come in the form of fungus (mould), worms and beetles which need to be inspected carefully.
    Common Rot noticed by constellation marine surveyors during detailed Yacht/Boat condition inspection and surveys.
    This is manifested by the presence of external yellow spots on the ends of the timber and is often accompanied by yellowish dust especially where the pieces of timber are in contact. The main cause is poor ventilation of the timber.
    What is Wet Rot and how significant is it to be noticed during Yacht repair inspection?
    Moisture, especially in the presence of warmth, will dissolve out some of the constituents of the cell walls and thereby cause decay. However, timber kept constantly immersed in water may soften but does not, in general, decay. It is the cyclical nature of wetting and drying that does the damage.
    - See more at: http://www.marinesurveyordubai.com/yacht-repair-inspection-dubai/#sthash.cSi1z6K7.dpuf

    ReplyDelete